Berklee Study Abroad

Program Information

Berklee's study abroad program in Valencia, Spain provides globally minded students the opportunity to become successful global music leaders and to prepare for international careers. At the Valencia campus, students may take advantage of performance and experiential learning opportunities, meet top visiting artists, and network with graduate students on campus.

When To Go

  • Berklee College of Music students should check their major grid or their major department's webpage to determine the best time to go abroad.
  • Boston Conservatory at Berklee instrumental music students may study abroad during their junior or senior year. Conservatory students should consult with their advisors to determine when they might attend.
  • Students from other schools should consult with the study abroad office at their home institution.Read more about Admissions, including eligibility and when to apply.

Studio Orientation

Students get familiar with studio equipment during orientation week.

Lunch in the Cantina

Students line up for lunch in the cantina on campus.

Lago de Conciertos

A study abroad student performs in the Lago de Conciertos concert series.

In the Classroom

A graduate student works on vocals in class as a study abroad student observes.

In the Studio

In the Studio

Study abroad student Tonina Saputo performs Historia de Amor, a recording done with the Mediterranean Music Institute on the campus studios.

First Days on Campus

First Days on Campus

Students talk about their first impressions of the program during the first week of orientation.

Students on Campus

Students socialize in front of campus between classes.

Technology Lab

Performing at the Tennis Open

Performing at the Tennis Open

A study abroad student was selected to perform Vivir la Vida at the Valencia Tenis Open.

Special Events

Study abroad students have an opportunity to participate in special campus events, such as the Women's Empower Symposium in spring 2015.

Campus Tour

Students take a tour of campus and the Palau opera house during orientation week.

Learning Spanish

Students participate in a group activity during a Spanish class.

What the Program Gives You

In addition to the learning mastered by all Berklee students, students who complete the Berklee Study Abroad program will:

  • articulate their identity in a global context;
  • evaluate the connections between their own personal decision-making and various local and global issues;
  • evaluate and apply diverse perspectives to complex subjects in the face of multiple and even conflicting positions (i.e., cultural, disciplinary, and ethical);
  • apply a deep understanding of multiple worldviews and experiences;
  • explain and connect two or more cultures historically or in contemporary contexts;
  • apply musical, cultural, and historical knowledge from Spain; and
  • address complex global problems using interdisciplinary perspectives independently or with others.

Program Highlights

Live and Recorded Performance

The program also offers unique, meaningful, and frequent opportunities for students to engage in recording and the art of performance. Students can gain international exposure through the student concert series at the Lago de Conciertos, at Berklee-produced concerts, and, in certain circumstances, in gigs at important clubs in Valencia and the rest of Spain.

Advance Your Studies

Courses are offered from across the curriculum and for a variety of majors, so students may find the classes they need to progress in their programs to meet graduation requirements. In addition, students may complete a minor in music technology in one semester.

Mediterranean Culture and Music

Music is essential to the history and people of Valencia, where students are exposed to a wide spectrum of cultures and audiences, and to a vibrant gigging community. Students are in a prime location to visit other parts of Spain and Europe.

Program Dates

Fall 2018: September 1 - December 24, 2018

  • Move-In: September 1 - 2 (Students may move in either day)
  • Move-Out: December 22 - 24 (Students must move out by 12pm on December 24)

Spring 2019: January 13 - May 10, 2019

  • Move-In: January 13 - 14 (Students may move in either day)
  • Move-Out: May 11 - 13 (Students must move out by 12pm on May 13)

See the Valencia Academic Calendar for the full program schedule for fall and spring. Program dates are subject to change.

Courses

The Valencia campus experience offers students access to state-of-the-art recording, technology labs, and classrooms in an intimate academic setting. Students may freely choose the courses they wish to take, as long as they meet the prerequisites for each course and they sign up for a full course load of 12 to 16 credits. Students from outside Berklee work with an academic advisor to define their course load.

Students interested in doing the music technology minor must take the courses defined by the minor.

Class Color Code

  • Orange: Berklee College of Music class offered in Valencia, Boston, and/or online
  • Blue: Berklee College of Music class offered exclusively in Valencia
  • Green: Berklee College of Music online class

Global Citizenship Seminar

VL-235 Global Citizenship Seminar
  • VL-235
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: None

Immersion into a different culture broadens understanding of one's own culture and society. This course develops students' awareness of and communication between cultures, highlights the importance of diversity, encourages conversation, and explores global issues in context. Its goal is to help students articulate their identity as artists and global citizens. The course is designed as a seminar, with hour-long weekly meeting, including speakers, visits, special events, and experiential learning. Students are required to perform a diversity-related project.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1eXxH5MPHAhcgVWmz38-YtRRk001QzjghfYIgscNfo-0/...

Performance and Professional Music Courses

ENJZ-220 Small Band Jazz Rating 4
  • ENJZ-220
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: Overall ensemble rating 4

The Small Band Jazz Rating 4 ensemble will study and perform jazz in the context of a small band. Students will participate in weekly supervised rehearsals. They will focus on playing standard jazz arrangements with special attention to the swing feel, playing through song forms, and the further development of standard jazz repertoire and vocabulary. Additionally, students will be introduced to improvising over complex chord changes, more complex song forms, as well as an introduction to a variety of rhythmic feels within the genre of jazz. Emphasis will be given to stylistic integrity, as well as melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic accuracy.

ENMX-221 Latin Jazz with Vocals
  • ENMX-221
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: Overall ensemble rating 4

Small group performance in jazz, rock, swing, and Latin idioms. In this course, students will participate in weekly supervised rehearsals. Students will gain experience in performing every song selected for the semester. Emphasis will be given to stylistic integrity, as well as melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic accuracy. Instrumentation: trumpet, alto, tenor, flute, piano, guitar, bass, drums, vibes, and strings.

ENGB-404 Middle Eastern/Flamenco Ensemble
  • ENGB-404
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: None

The Middle Eastern/Flamenco Ensemble will study and perform the music of the contemporary Middle Eastern and flamenco Music. This course is part of a team-taught class between Middle Eastern and flamenco styles. In this course, students will participate in weekly supervised rehearsals. Students will gain experience in performing and improvising in a groove-oriented setting. Emphasis will be given to stylistic integrity as well as melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic accuracy.

ILPH-359 Brazilian Rhythms and Percussion
  • ILPH-359
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: None

A lab focusing on rhythmic techniques and song styles of Brazilian music and their related percussion instruments. Development of performance skills through study of audio and video recordings as well as supervised ensemble playing. Note: ILPH-357 may be taken instead of this course.

ILRE-375 Recital Workshop for Performance Majors
  • ILRE-375
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: PIXX-212 and current enrollment in RPXX-311

Required for all fifth-semester performance majors. Each student will perform three times during the semester. Students will critique one another's performances. Topics to be discussed will include repertoire, stage presence, constructive criticism, and mental preparation.

ISKB-211 Basic Keyboard Techniques 1
  • ISKB-211
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: PW-111

For non-piano principals. Comping, harmonic continuity. Triads, seventh chords, melody, and accompaniment. Standard song forms, blues.

ISKB-212 Basic Keyboard Techniques 2
  • ISKB-212
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: ISKB-211

Continuation of ISKB-211. Advanced comping, voicings, additional melody with accompaniment.

PFSS-301 Survey of Mediterranean Musical Styles
  • PFSS-301
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: None

This course will examine the various tonalities, meters and compositional structures that characterize the various music styles from the Mediterranean region. This is a survey course focused on the folk music from the Mediterranean with a spotlight on how melody is the defining and dominant feature of the music. Students will explore modal systems with limited harmonic progression and tonalities not always consistent with western tonal systems and metric forms. The influence of religious music, the differing ethnic traditions, and the sociocultural differences of the principal music sources will be reviewed and studied. Listening, performing, songwriting, and sight singing are the main activities of this course.

PSW-425 Flamenco Rhythm Styles
  • PSW-425
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: None

This course enables students to enhance their knowledge of Flamenco music, focusing on the study and practice of its rhythms and percussion. Composing and arranging music inspired by the Flamenco tradition will lead the students to discover the style, expanding their musical language and creative skills. Students will develop their ability to play Flamenco cajón and claps. Working under the direction of a senior faculty member, students will complete exercises that enhance their sense of rhythm, interpretative and improvisational skills in a practical environment that involves composition and arranging projects, listening and playing music. Students learn to maintain stylistic integrity by developing their domain over rhythmic practices associated with Flamenco music.

PIXX-XXX Private Instruction

  • PIXX-XXX
  • 1 or 2 credit(s)

PMH-250 Movement for Musicians
  • PMH-250
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: None

This course is for any musician interested in being more comfortable in their body and developing confidence through movement. The musician's first asset is their physical body and it is critical that performers develop a body language and awareness that allows them to fully deliver their artistic vision. This course fosters full-bodied expression through increased awareness of breath and alignment coupled with discovering one's full range of movement. Developing your senses including sight, touch, hearing and kinesthetic to enhance your overall performance skills. Communication, strength, stamina, wellness, intention, performance, and audition skills are developed thorugh movement disciplines that may include various dance forms, yoga or other somatic practices, games and improvisation. No previous dance or movement experience is required.

PSIJ-215 Standard Jazz Repertoire 1
  • PSIJ-215
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: Overall ensemble rating 3

Building and retaining a functional repertoire of approximately 30 selected standards and jazz standards that form a common vocabulary and basis for study among jazz musicians. Development of skills to effectively memorize the melody, harmony, and rhythm of selected repertoire. Recommended for students who plan to take jazz improvisation techniques courses.

ENDS-400 Directed Study
  • ENDS-400
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: Written approval of course instructor

The Directed Study ensemble will study and perform a specific genre or artist of their liking. In this course, students will participate in weekly supervised rehearsals. Students will gain experience in performing the particular directed studies' compositions. Emphasis will be given to stylistic integrity, as well as melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic accuracy.

Music Business Courses

MB-211 Legal Aspects of the Music Industry
  • MB-211
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: None

An overview of business and legal issues of special concern to musicians and songwriters, with special emphasis on copyright law, recording and music publishing agreements, and relationships between artists and other parties, including managers, producers, and investors.

MB-287 Business Communication
  • MB-287
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: None

An in-depth study of the nature of human and electronic communication. Students write and edit a variety of business documents including cover letters, memos, reports, and proposals, among others, as well as practice extemporaneous speaking, presenting to a group, planning and running meetings, and supervising teams.

MB-389 Managing Technology-Driven Business
  • MB-389
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MB-255 or MB-355

This course will explore the underlying technology and terminology required to effectively communicate and conduct business in the technology-driven marketplace. In today's business environment, it is essential for managers and executives to understand the basic concepts behind contemporary information systems and how they can be used effectively in business. Topics include hardware, software, network architecture, information security, data warehousing, customer interfaces, and online marketing opportunities. Students will have the opportunity to work with common open source applications used for content management, customer relationship management, online purchasing and payment systems, and more.

MB-391 Concerts and Touring
  • MB-391
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MB-201, MB-211, and MB-275

Business aspects of producing and promoting successful tours and shows. Emphases include: (1) the promoter's ability to purchase talent and produce successful shows, taking into consideration such matters as competition, population, guarantees and percentage splits, ticket pricing and distribution, advertising budgets, production costs, sponsorships, rental agreements, labor, security, concessions, tour packages, and promoter-owned venues; and (2) managing and producing a successful tour, focusing on a tour theme and marketing plan, routing, itineraries, riders, offers, contracts, subcontractors, show and tour personnel, merchandising, sponsorships, day-of-show, and show settlements.

MB-499 International Industry Seminar
  • MB-499
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: LENG-111

The global music industry is responsible for the supply of music content and brands to music consumers around the world. The digital environment in which this international flow of content occurs has created a new paradigm for regional and national music brands willing to expand beyond their home market, regardless of geography. In this course, students examine the national and regional music industries that have adapted particularly well to this new business model and forged paths into various international markets—many of which, to a great extent, remain impenetrable. Students analyze these successful businesses and the various ways they have reached transnational audiences, which often challenge common practices in the global music industry. 

Core Music Courses

CM-211 Tonal Harmony and Composition 1
  • CM-211
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: PW-111

Functional tonal harmony analyzed and composed in various musical textures. Emphasis on voice leading, melodic writing, and figured bass.

CM-212 Tonal Harmony and Composition 2
  • CM-212
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: CM-211 or CM-251

Continuation of CM-211. Advanced tonal harmony and intermediate compositional procedures. Emphasis on harmonies with sevenths, other upper extensions, chromatic alterations as well as modulation.

COND-211 Conducting 1
  • COND-211
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: ET-211 or ET-231

Techniques of conducting vocal and instrumental music. Fundamental beat patterns. Discussion and study of terminology, problems of tempo, phrasing, and articulation.

COND-212 Conducting 2
  • COND-212
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: COND-211 or COND-216

The course assumes basic beat pattern knowledge and covers three areas: (1) symphonic conducting with an instrumental soloist (concerto), (2) symphonic conducting with a vocal soloist (operatic aria), and (3) symphonic conducting of a major modern work involving complete meter changes. Works used include a romantic piano or violin concerto, an operatic excerpt, and a piece such as Petrouchka, The Rite of Spring, or Symphonies of Wind Instruments.

CP-210 The Art of Counterpoint
  • CP-210
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: HR-112, ET-112, and CM-211 or CM-251

This course instructs students in the fundamental principles of free counterpoint (i.e., composition with melodic lines) with an emphasis on two-part writing. Through the utilization of a three-pronged focus on principles, literature, and experiential practice, students complete exercises and projects involving composition and performance within the common-practice period with additional attention to and experience in contemporary tonal practice.

Please note there is currently no online course equivalency for this course. 

ET-211 Ear Training 3
  • ET-211
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: ET-112

Development of ear training skills through performance and dictation. Study of melodies, intervals, harmony, and solfege in Lydian, Mixolydian, Dorian, and Phrygian modes, mixed modes, and harmonic and melodic minor. Continued study of rhythms, meters, conducting patterns, and notation.

ET-212 Ear Training 4
  • ET-212
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: ET-211

Continuation of ET-211. Modal singing and dictation studies. Interval studies, two- and three-part dictation. Basic atonal melodic studies.

HR-211 Harmony 3
  • HR-211
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: HR-112

Students continue their analysis and application of major and minor key harmony; elaboration of subdominant minor and modal interchange; and chord scale theory. Students review melodic construction and the melody/harmony relationship. They also review the individual note analysis of melodies. The course introduces substitute dominant and related II-7 chords, diminished chord patterns, and modulation.

 

HR-212 Harmony 4
  • HR-212
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: HR-211

This course provides continued study of principles of modern chord progression, particularly deceptive resolutions of secondary dominants, dominant seventh chords without dominant function, and contiguous dominant motion. Students examine melodic construction, form, and melody/harmony relationship; modal interchange; pedal point and ostinato; modal harmony and modal composition; compound chords; and constant structures.

 

Contemporary Writing and Production and Film Scoring Courses

AR-112 Arranging 2
  • AR-112
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: AR-111 and HR-112

In this course, students study the properties of the trumpet, alto saxophone, tenor saxophone, trombone, and baritone saxophone. Students also explore the writing and arranging processes of standard and spread voicings, as well as approach techniques, melodic embellishment, and guide tone backgrounds. Students apply the writing processes to soli and background writing for two-, three-, four-, and five-part combinations of these instruments. It is recommended that CW-171 be taken by CWPR majors prior to enrolling in AR-112.

 

CW-191 Sequencing and Production Techniques
  • CW-191
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: AR-111 and MTEC-111

The course covers the necessary tools, techniques, and applications of MIDI sequencing and digital audio for writing and production. Main topics include the MIDI standard and its applications, set up and use of digital audio workstations (DAWs), integration of MIDI and audio tracks/sources, use of software synthesizers, basic mixing techniques, audio theory, equipment, and techniques. Through practical examples, activities, and projects the student will learn how to effectively use a DAW to write and produce music. Emphasis is on technological needs of the contemporary writer.

CW-261 DAW Writing and Production
  • CW-261
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: ISKB-211 (non-piano principals) and CW-191

The advanced student will learn to utilize digital audio workstations (DAW) to create arrangements of either original or existing musical elements. This course focuses on the creative use of technology in music production. Topics covered include signal flow of MIDI and audio signal within the DAW sound processing plugins, choosing appropriate sounds and combining elements from software synthesizers, alternate approaches to quantizing and refining rhythmic grooves, hybrid production techniques (audio and MIDI), use of the DAW for scoring to picture and basic synthesis techniques. In addition to using their own laptops in the Professional Writing Technology Lab students are expected to have the CWP major bundle.

FS-114 Introduction to Film Scoring for Non-Majors (Only Fall Semester)
  • FS-114
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: LENG-111

Investigation of the aesthetic relationship between film and music. Discussion of the many functions of film music with analysis of its most effective application to dramatic situations. Exploration of career opportunities in film and television music. This course is suitable for students not intending to major in film scoring.

FS-221 Intensive Introduction to Film Scoring (Only Spring Semester)
  • FS-221
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: LENG-111, PW-111, ET-111, and MTEC-111

This intensive introduction to the field of film scoring is intended for current and prospective film scoring majors, as well as other students looking for a more in-depth exploration of the field of film scoring. In addition to the investigation of the aesthetic relationship between film and music, discussion of the many functions of film music with analysis of its most effective application to dramatic situations, and exploration of career opportunities in film and television music, this course will present early opportunities for a student to start scoring simple film cues.

Liberal Arts Courses

LENG-223 Literature
  • LENG-223
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: LENG-111

In this course, students explore different themes and genres within the field of literature, examining critical and creative thinking through literary analysis. Specifically, students will explore literary genres and devices, learn the conventions of literary analysis and elements of literary theory, and apply textual evidence in response to literary works. Students will explore how culture, society, and history impact literature and will learn how to discuss those elements. Although all sections will offer exposure to poetry and fiction, each LENG-223 course has a different focus and will explore readings from a variety of cultural perspectives. The titles of individual sections of LENG-223 identify the theme of that section and descriptions for each section are available at www.berklee.edu/liberal-arts.

LHIS-223 History Topics: History of Spanish Film

  • LHIS-223
  • 3 credits

In this course we will explore the history of Spain through an examination of Spanish film. We will begin our study in the 1890s and work our way to contemporary Spain, emphasizing the Surrealism of the 1920s and 1930s, the propagandistic yet surprisingly intriguing films of the Franco years (1939-1975), the counter-cultural post-Franco 1980s known as ¨la Movida,¨ and the amazingly productive years that lead us to today´s Spain.

One of the primary objectives of our course is to demonstrate that Hispanic film cannot be stereotyped as falling into a determined genre of film-making. The films we will view and analyze will make you laugh, maybe cry, cause you to feel uneasy, perhaps spark an interest to learn more about Spanish cultural history or explore the thorny dynamics of determined social issues, repel you yet intrigue you at the same time, and even baffle you. Another very important objective of this course is to show that film genres, artistic movements, history, politics, economics and social issues feed off of each other. So, while the ever-popular Almodóvar and Penelope Cruz will be given their due, it is our objective to approach this class with an inclusive attitude towards other very important figures that are not as well known outside of the Spanish-speaking world. In addition to Almodovar, students will also benefit by viewing films directed by Buñuel, Palacios, Saura, Bollaín, Trueba, Bigas Luna, Amenábar and Bayona among others.

LVIS-223 Art History Topics
  • LVIS-223
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: LENG-111

The various sections of Art History Topics focus on different and more narrowly defined themes, rather than a broad historical survey. Topics may include the Art of Egypt, the meeting of Eastern and Western Art, 20th-Century American and European Art, and others. Periodically, a visiting scholar may teach a section on the art, architecture, and archeology of cultures such as those of pre-Columbian Central and South America; the indigenous peoples of North America; and the various societies of Africa, Asia, or the Middle East. The focus of these special sections would include the material artifacts and the interpretations, debates, and methodological approaches to these objects within the literature of the field. All sections of this course present individual topics. Individual course descriptions are available to registering students at http://www.berklee.edu/liberal-arts/courses/liberal-arts-topics-courses.

LHUM-400 Professional Development Seminar
  • LHUM-400
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: Sixth-semester standing

The Professional Development Seminar provides an opportunity for students in their sixth semester to reflect upon their academic and professional experience at Berklee, prepare to complete their Berklee programs, and transition from college into the professional world and/or graduate school. Students evaluate their knowledge, skills, abilities, and interests as they develop and/or refine college and career goals. Students also explore their own identities and their professional and personal relationships as they reflect on the role of the artist in society generally and their role as a musician in their community specifically. Students learn business, entrepreneurship, legal, and communication skills, and address issues of business ethics. Additionally, students refine and redirect their Berklee College of Music electronic portfolio towards a professional model and explore issues of presentation and critique. The Professional Development Seminar provides a creative and reflective atmosphere that encourages students to participate in their own learning while preparing for their future.

LMSC-208 Music Acoustics
  • LMSC-208
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: Passing score on the General Math Exam and the Logarithms Exam, LMSC-130, or completion of college level precalculus or higher; and LENG-106 or native English speaker

This course is a survey of acoustical phenomena relating to music. The course includes an overview of the nature of sound waves and vibration, sound propagation and room acoustics, sound level and its measurement, the human ear and perception, and tuning systems. Course material is directed toward the contemporary musician's need to understand acoustical phenomena in various contexts, including performance, writing, and music technology applications. Note: This is a required course for CWPR majors. ELPD and MPED majors are required to take either LMSC-208 or LMSC-209.

LMSC-221 The Science of Health
  • LMSC-221
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: LENG-111

This course is designed to provide a scientific approach to issues of health and wellness necessary for the pursuit of a healthy lifestyle. Topics such as nutrition, exercise, stress, sexuality, substance abuse, eating disorders, and the physical environment will be examined in the context of human physiology. Note: This course may be used to fulfill the natural science requirement.

LSOC-211 General Psychology
  • LSOC-211
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: LENG-111

This course is a survey of the history, theory, and applications of general psychology, including the study of human behavior, factors in psychological development, methods of measurement, and the brain.

 

LSOC-225 Principles of Economics
  • LSOC-225
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: Passing score on the General Math Exam, LMSC-130, or completion of college level precalculus or higher; and LENG-111

An analysis of supply and demand in the international music marketplace, as affecting issues of pricing, employment, the output of goods and services, and competition. Emphasis is also placed on the techniques of financial management found within a music-oriented business, including planning and forecasting, allocation of resources, and profit analysis, as well as the monetary transmission mechanisms found in international business. Note: For MBUS majors, this course can be used to fulfill the social science requirement for degree students.

LSPN-161 Spanish 1
  • LSPN-161
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: None

This course covers basic grammar, composition, and cultural reading selections. The emphasis is on pronunciation and conversational Spanish. Note: This course is not available to students for whom Spanish is one of their primary languages and/or primary languages of instruction.

LSPN-262 Spanish 2
  • LSPN-262
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: None

A continuation of LSPN-161, this course covers more advanced grammar, composition, and reading selections. Emphasis continues on pronunciation and conversational Spanish. Note: This course is not available for credit to students for whom this is a first language. Note: This course is not available to students for whom Spanish is one of their primary languages and/or primary languages of instruction.

LSPN-363 Spanish 3
  • LSPN-363
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: None

This course develops the language skills built in Spanish 1 and 2. Students learn Latin American and Spanish culture, including music and literature. Exploring a variety of texts and disciplines, and focusing on conversation, students deepen their language skills. Grammar lessons are embedded in reading and writing assignments. Note: This course is not available to students for whom Spanish is one of their primary languages and/or primary languages of instruction.

LSPN-464 Spanish 4
  • LSPN-464
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: None

Spanish 4 is a continuation of Spanish 3 as students develop advanced language skills through readings and analyses of literature and cinema. This course focuses on representations of Latin American and Spanish culture including music, poetry, and fiction. Students explore a variety of texts as a means of deepening language skills through an integrated curriculum. Grammar lessons will be embedded in reading and writing assignments. Note: This course is not available to students for whom Spanish is one of their primary languages and/or primary languages of instruction.

LMAS-259 Spanish Music, Culture, and Society
  • LMAS-259
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: LENG-111

In this course, students will become familiar with the underlying anthropological and sociological foundations of modern Spanish culture. The course content will provide a solid understanding of the cultural idiosyncrasy of the Spanish people in addition to an overview of Spain’s history. Students will also explore and analyze different trends and phenomena of modern day Spain, along with some traditions that still hold in our time. Spanish music history and artistry from ancient times to the present will be studied, with a special focus on the way that music shapes and is shaped by society. Students will study Spanish styles of music, including, among others, folk, popular music, and flamenco. An exploration of the ways that other Mediterranean cultures have shaped Spain will be used as a lens to explore music history, artistry, and culture. In addition, students will explore the ways that music is an expressive form that reflects and influences society.

 

MHIS-201 History of Music in the European Tradition: Topics
  • MHIS-201
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: CM-211 or CM-251, and LENG-111

In this course, students will explore the art music of Europe and the United States. The course will address such important trends as the evolution of counterpoint, the birth of opera, and the emergence of post-tonal compositional practices, using a selection of repertoire spanning the Middle Ages to the present. Students will finish the course with a clear understanding of how the polystylistic music of the twenty-first century has evolved from past practices. Additionally, students will develop a greater understanding of how other cultural forces have shaped musical practice in the West. This course will explore specific topics in the history of Western classical music in a chronological order.

 

Music Technology Courses

MP-114 Critical Listening Lab for Musicians
  • MP-114
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MTEC-111

This online course focuses on developing critical listening skills with particular emphasis on analyzing recording and mix techniques in the context of the popular music mix. Topics include: acoustics of the critical listening environment; mix elements such as balances, panning, EQ, reverb, compression, delay and time-based effects; instrument identification; stylistic comparisons of recording and mix techniques. Listening analysis examples and concepts are reinforced through weekly critical listening assignments. A set of weekly audio ear training drills are also part of the class.

MP-115 Production Analysis Lab for Musicians
  • MP-115
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MTEC-111

This course represents a step-by-step approach to the essential elements of effective records. Using in-class evaluation of demos, masters and commercial recordings, it takes students through an in-depth analysis and appraisal of the emotional effectiveness of recordings, with consideration for: artist identity, vision and intention; melody, lyrics and song form; arrangement, performance, and mixing. Several in-class presentations of student analysis projects are required.

MTI-303 Recording and Mixing Skills for Music Production
  • MTI-303
  • 4 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: ET-112 and HR-112

This project-based course is broken into two weekly sessions, the first focused on production and engineering concepts and the second focused on mixing skills. Throughout the semester, students complete two production projects: a step-by-step, singer-songwriter multitrack recording, and an exact sound-alike of an existing pivotal or hit record. Students experience the complete production process from preproduction though delivery, acquiring technical skills including multitrack recording techniques, microphone technique for vocals, guitars, drum-set and other instruments, and an understanding of signal flow, editing, mixing and delivery in the modern DAW environment. Students also gain experience with effective techniques of music production, including identifying goals, serving the emotional content of the song, effective arranging for records, and interpersonal issues surrounding the recording process.

Study abroad students outside of Berklee enrolling in this course must have requisite musical background. 

MTI-304 Live Sound and Stage Craft
  • MTI-304
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MTEC-111

Live Sound and Stage Craft teaches students the ins and outs of setting up and operating sound reinforcement systems. Students develop knowledge of signal flow, mixing board operation, microphone choice and placement as well as strategies to avoid feedback. Weekly hands-on guided set up and operation of sound reinforcement systems help illustrate concepts and allow students to learn through the power of experience. This includes mixing from the stage while performing, mixing for other musicians for and from the FOH (front of house) position, as well as monitors. In addition, students acquire effective set up and stage management skills as well as the common communication protocol with other musicians and technicians in live sound reinforcement situations. Finally, implementation of adapted practices and systems for problematic spaces or venues is also explored. Students will also gain experience with basic lighting and video stagecraft systems.

MTI-307 Electronic Dance Music Creation With Ableton Live
  • MTI-307
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MTEC-111

This course explores topics in electronic production and live performance techniques related to modern electronic dance music production, sound design, arrangement, and performance. Students will generate content and create their own music while learning how to use Ableton Live Suite. Students will learn to analyze electronic music, and explore techniques for remixing, performing, and creating electronic music.

MTI-308 Virtual Production Techniques
  • MTI-308
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: ET-112 and HR-112

This is an 'in-the-box' project-based virtual production course. Students learn to produce short sound-alikes of fragments of contemporary hit records employing sequencing and virtual instruments. They also learn to produce a full acoustic band cover using virtual instruments and one live instrument and/or vocalist. Additionally they learn to produce short musical creations by chopping and editing audio, incorporating tempo mapping, elastic audio, Melodyne, looping, beat detective, and other manipulation tools. Students also learn the skills needed to edit and arrange music to picture.

Study abroad students outside of Berklee enrolling in this course must have requisite musical background. 

MTI-309 Music Video Production and Dissemination
  • MTI-309
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MTEC-111

This course provides an introduction to the art and technology of creating music videos. Students learn the challenges and possibilities of representing music visually through the art of filmmaking. They explore the fundamental tools and techniques of music video production by reviewing and analyzing groundbreaking music videos. They also apply those techniques in the hands-on production of personal music videos.

MTI-310 Live Electronic Performance and DJ Skills
  • MTI-310
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MTEC-111

An introduction to live electronic music performance and DJ skills, beginning with the use of the turntable as a musical instrument. Students will explore the culture and aesthetics of Hip-hop, turntablism, club DJs, radio, and mash-up DJs, and will master the following techniques: cueing, mixing, beat matching, beat extending, mash-ups, blending, and scratching (basic, scribble, laser, uzi, stab, cut, transformer, crab, chirp and flare). Students will create their own live mixes and present them as midterm and final performances.

Online Courses

Students may take online courses through Inside Berklee Courses while they are in Valencia. Blended courses are not available in Valencia, unless they are included in the course list above.

Students often take the following online courses while in Valencia:

  • CW-171 Groove Writing
  • CW-216 Vocal Writing
  • PM-340 The Artist Entrepreneur
  • PM-425 The Business of Professional Music
  • PM-476 Pro Music Capstone Project (Professional Music majors)
  • MHIS-331 History of Film Music

Music Technology Minor

Music Technology Minor

Music Technology Minor

Watch to learn about the Music Technology Minor in Valencia.


Working in the Technology Lab

Students have access to two technology labs, with the latest software and hardware in the industry.


Electronic Music Creation and Performance

Students can choose an elective to explore live electronic performance and DJ skills or electronic dance music creation with Ableton Live.

Live Production

Explore live sound and stagecraft in the music technology minor, plus there are additional opportunities to audition to perform in the Innovation: ¡En Vivo! concert series.

Berklee's minor in music technology arms students with the tools they need to effectively leverage technology to create and distribute their music. The immersive, integrated courses are designed to be completed in one semester at Berklee’s state-of-the-art Valencia campus, where students can take full advantage of its powerful combination of facilities, staff, and faculty.

Berklee College of Music students who wish to declare the music technology minor should send their Declaration/Change of Major/Minor form to Enric Alberich for chair approval.

The minor consists of all required courses and one elective course, for a total of 10 credits.

Class Color Code

  • Orange: Berklee College of Music class offered in Valencia, Boston, and/or online
  • Blue: Berklee College of Music class offered exclusively in Valencia
  • Green: Berklee College of Music online class

Required Courses

MP-114 Critical Listening Lab for Musicians
  • MP-114
  • 1 credit(s)

This online course focuses on developing critical listening skills with particular emphasis on analyzing recording and mix techniques in the context of the popular music mix. Topics include: acoustics of the critical listening environment; mix elements such as balances, panning, EQ, reverb, compression, delay and time-based effects; instrument identification; stylistic comparisons of recording and mix techniques. Listening analysis examples and concepts are reinforced through weekly critical listening assignments. A set of weekly audio ear training drills are also part of the class.

MP-115 Production Analysis Lab for Musicians
  • MP-115
  • 1 credit(s)

This course represents a step-by-step approach to the essential elements of effective records. Using in-class evaluation of demos, masters and commercial recordings, it takes students through an in-depth analysis and appraisal of the emotional effectiveness of recordings, with consideration for: artist identity, vision and intention; melody, lyrics and song form; arrangement, performance, and mixing. Several in-class presentations of student analysis projects are required.

MTI-303 Recording and Mixing Skills for Music Production
  • MTI-303
  • 4 credit(s)

This project-based course is broken into two weekly sessions, the first focused on production and engineering concepts and the second focused on mixing skills. Throughout the semester, students complete two production projects: a step-by-step, singer-songwriter multitrack recording, and an exact sound-alike of an existing pivotal or hit record. Students experience the complete production process from preproduction though delivery, acquiring technical skills including multitrack recording techniques, microphone technique for vocals, guitars, drum-set and other instruments, and an understanding of signal flow, editing, mixing and delivery in the modern DAW environment. Students also gain experience with effective techniques of music production, including identifying goals, serving the emotional content of the song, effective arranging for records, and interpersonal issues surrounding the recording process.

Study abroad students outside of Berklee enrolling in this course must have requisite musical background. 

MTI-304 Live Sound and Stage Craft
  • MTI-304
  • 2 credit(s)

Live Sound and Stage Craft teaches students the ins and outs of setting up and operating sound reinforcement systems. Students develop knowledge of signal flow, mixing board operation, microphone choice and placement as well as strategies to avoid feedback. Weekly hands-on guided set up and operation of sound reinforcement systems help illustrate concepts and allow students to learn through the power of experience. This includes mixing from the stage while performing, mixing for other musicians for and from the FOH (front of house) position, as well as monitors. In addition, students acquire effective set up and stage management skills as well as the common communication protocol with other musicians and technicians in live sound reinforcement situations. Finally, implementation of adapted practices and systems for problematic spaces or venues is also explored. Students will also gain experience with basic lighting and video stagecraft systems.

Elective Courses

MTI-307 Electronic Dance Music Creation With Ableton Live
  • MTI-307
  • 2 credit(s)

This course explores topics in electronic production and live performance techniques related to modern electronic dance music production, sound design, arrangement, and performance. Students will generate content and create their own music while learning how to use Ableton Live Suite. Students will learn to analyze electronic music, and explore techniques for remixing, performing, and creating electronic music.

MTI-308 Virtual Production Techniques
  • MTI-308
  • 2 credit(s)

This is an 'in-the-box' project-based virtual production course. Students learn to produce short sound-alikes of fragments of contemporary hit records employing sequencing and virtual instruments. They also learn to produce a full acoustic band cover using virtual instruments and one live instrument and/or vocalist. Additionally they learn to produce short musical creations by chopping and editing audio, incorporating tempo mapping, elastic audio, Melodyne, looping, beat detective, and other manipulation tools. Students also learn the skills needed to edit and arrange music to picture.

Study abroad students outside of Berklee enrolling in this course must have requisite musical background. 

MTI-309 Music Video Production and Dissemination
  • MTI-309
  • 2 credit(s)

This course provides an introduction to the art and technology of creating music videos. Students learn the challenges and possibilities of representing music visually through the art of filmmaking. They explore the fundamental tools and techniques of music video production by reviewing and analyzing groundbreaking music videos. They also apply those techniques in the hands-on production of personal music videos.

MTI-310 Live Electronic Performance and DJ Skills
  • MTI-310
  • 2 credit(s)

An introduction to live electronic music performance and DJ skills, beginning with the use of the turntable as a musical instrument. Students will explore the culture and aesthetics of Hip-hop, turntablism, club DJs, radio, and mash-up DJs, and will master the following techniques: cueing, mixing, beat matching, beat extending, mash-ups, blending, and scratching (basic, scribble, laser, uzi, stab, cut, transformer, crab, chirp and flare). Students will create their own live mixes and present them as midterm and final performances.

Faculty

Fabien Aubry

Instructor

Clara Barbera

Director of Student Affairs, Valencia Campus; Instructor

John Broaddus

Instructor

Devon Bryant

Instructor

Ben Cantil

Assistant Professor

Daniel Flors

Instructor

Jon Forsyth

Assistant Professor

Timotej Kotnik

Instructor

Nacho Marco

Instructor

Lucas Martín

Instructor

Steffen Meister

Instructor

Catalina Millan

Assistant Professor

Emilien Moyon

Program Director, Global Entertainment and Music Business

Federico Nathan

Instructor

David Nordlund

Instructor

Polo Orti

Instructor

Yoel Páez

Instructor

Alexandre Perrin

Associate Professor

German Ramos

Instructor

Olga Román

Instructor

Perico Sambeat

Instructor

Israel Sandoval

Instructor

Albert Sanz

Instructor

Patrick Soria

Instructor

Liz Teutsch

Associate Professor

Joshua Wheatley

Instructor

Gary Willis

Instructor

Maria Zarza

Instructor

Private Instruction Faculty, by Instrument

  • Electric bass: Gary Willis
  • Violin: Federico Nathan
  • Drums: Mariano Steimberg
  • Vibraphone: Víctor Mendoza
  • Guitar: Dani Flors, Israel Sandoval
  • Piano: Polo Orti
  • Winds: Perico Sambeat
  • Voice: Celia Mur, Olga Román, and Brian Zalmijn
  • Hand percussion: Yoel Paez

Granada Trip

Granada is a city in the autonomous community of Andalusia, Spain, located at the foot of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. While in Valencia, students have the opportunity to participate in a group trip to this beautiful Spanish city. The trip is optional and organized by Berklee.

Trip Highlights

The Alhambra
The Alhambra, a Moorish citadel and palace, is in Granada. It is the most renowned building of the Andalusian Islamic historical legacy with its many cultural attractions that make Granada a popular tourist destination in Spain. The Almohad influence on architecture is preserved in the area of the city called the Albayzín with its fine examples of Moorish and Morisco construction. Granada is also well-known within Spain for the prestigious University of Granada which has about 80,000 students spread over five different campuses in the city.

El Albayzín
El Albayzín is a district of present-day Granada that retains the narrow winding streets of its Medieval Moorish past. It was declared a world heritage site in 1984, along with the more famous Alhambra. It rises on a hill facing the Alhambra and many tourists journey into the Albayzin primarily for the spectacular views of the Alhambra from the viewing point by the church of San Nicolas. Highlights within the area include the remains of an Arab bath complex, Granada's archeological museum, and the church of San Salvador, built on the remains of a Moorish mosque. The Albayzin also contains some original Moorish houses and a wide range of restaurants, including several streets whose eateries are inspired by North Africa. The oldest part of the medina dates to the 11th century, when the Zirids founded Granada as their new capital. Later constructions were added by the Almohads and the Nasrids.

Trip Itinerary

The trip itinerary is subject to change. Refer to the Valencia Academic Calendar for trip dates.

Day One

  • Morning: Meet at residence hall and travel by bus (approximately eight hours).
  • Afternoon: Group stops for lunch (on your own); arrival and hotel check-in.
  • Evening: Group dinner (included).

Day Two

  • Morning: Breakfast at the hotel (included); visit to La Alhambra.
  • Afternoon: Lunch (on your own); free time.
  • Evening: Group dinner (included); visit to Mirador de San Nicolas.

Day Three

  • Morning: Breakfast at the hotel (included); guided tour of the historic city.
  • Afternoon: Lunch (on your own); free time; flamenco music/dance master class.
  • Evening: Group dinner and flamenco show (included).

Day Four

  • Morning: Breakfast at the hotel (included); check out and depart for Valencia.
  • Afternoon: Group stops for lunch (included).
  • Evening: Arrive in Valencia.

Registration and Cost

*All study abroad students are automatically registered for the Granada trip. The trip fee is added to your Berklee tuition statement. See Tuition and Related Costs for the current fee. Students should bring additional spending money for lunch on the first three days and for personal items.

*If you will not attend the trip, you may remove it from your course schedule, and the trip fee will be removed from your statement.

Trip Photos

Berklee Study Abroad
These pictures were taken by students during the spring 2015 Granada trip. See more #BerkleeAbroad pictures on Instagram.

Housing

*Study abroad students are required to stay in housing arranged by Berklee. Living together as a cohort of students provides a safe and comfortable environment while abroad.

Several months before the program begins, students will submit their housing preferences, including residence, room type (single or double), and roommate (if applicable). Submitting your housing preferences is not a guarantee that you will be assigned your preferred housing option. Once assignments are made, changes may be considered on a case-by-case basis but cannot be guaranteed.

*Students who are at least 24 years old or have already studied for at least one semester at Berklee's Valencia campus are exempt from the housing requirement.

Residences

Galileo Galilei - Colegio Mayor
The Galileo Galilei residence has been hosting Berklee students since the Valencia campus first opened in 2012. Galileo is located at The Polytechnic University of Valencia. At Galileo there are single rooms with a private bathroom and double rooms with a bathroom shared by two roommates. There is a shared kitchen on the first floor. See Galileo rooms and facilities (descriptions in Spanish).

Collegiate - Marina Real
Collegiate - Marina Real is a new luxury residence that opened in fall 2018. At Collegiate, all rooms are studios (single occupancy) with a private bathroom and full kitchen. Read more about Collegiate.

See housing costs in the tuition section.

Basic Amenities

Students have access to many services at the residences, including:

  • Wireless internet (complementary)
  • Linens: sheets, towels, blankets, and pillows (complementary)
  • Cleaning service: rooms are cleaned once per week (complementary)
  • Kitchen utensil pack (fee if not returned)
  • Fitness Room (complementary)
  • TV/Games Room (complementary)
  • Music Room (complementary)
  • Laundry (fee varies)
  • Refrigerator in room - Galileo only (€11.00/month)
  • Meal plans - Galileo only: One meal per day (breakfast), €60.00/month; Two meals per day (breakfast, lunch OR dinner), €180.00/month; Three meals per day (breakfast, lunch, dinner), €300.00/month
  • Fees are subject to change.

Getting to Campus

The Berklee campus is located approximately two miles from the student residences. Many students bike, walk, or take the public bus to school. There is also a private shuttle bus that goes to and from the campus and the residences.

  • Private Shuttle Bus: The shuttle bus is available Monday to Friday. It leaves the residences in the morning and returns in the evening.
  • Bike: Many students take advantage of Valenbisi, Valencia’s public bike-sharing system. For approximately 30 euros students can sign up for a yearly pass that allows them unlimited use of bicycles, with the first half hour of each trip being free. There are Valenbisi stations located all around the city, including several that are close to the residences and to the campus.
  • Bus: There are public buses that connect the residences and the campus. Average travel time is about 25-40 minutes.
  • Walk: Valencia is known for its beautiful weather! Walking is a great way to travel to campus, while getting some exercise and soaking in the sun. Average travel time is 30-45 minutes.

Transportation to Berklee Valencia

Galileo Photos

Careers

Getting a degree from Berklee pushes you towards the next big step in your career, and coming to Valencia allows you to broaden your horizons and spend more time in the global music industry. As the liaison between Berklee Valencia and the industry, the International Career Center (ICC) is one of the resources you have to help get you from where you are now to where you want to be. The mission of the ICC is to provide expert guidance, cutting-edge resources, and professional development experiences to help our diverse body of students achieve their career goals. Rather than acting as a one-time job link, our overall focus is on career management. We help you access available resources and activities, and apply them to your career path.

See What the ICC Offers

Possible Career Paths

Getting a bachelor’s degree in one of Berklee’s many areas of study opens you to a world of possibilities in the music and entertainment industry and beyond. After graduating, many students find jobs working in all facets of the industry. To start to get an idea of what Berklee has to offer your career, we recommend exploring Berklee’s Career Communities. Here you will see the different ways that Berklee helps students to build communities in the business, composition, design, education, health and wellness, performance, and production industries.

See Career Communities

Industry Events and Conferences

Succeeding in the music and entertainment industry is all about building your professional network and making connections with the right people. Students are encouraged to take advantage of their time in Europe to attend or participate in the many music and performance-related events held in Spain and throughout Europe. All event participation and attendance is optional, and students make all the arrangements to attend on their own. In some cases, students may be able to access special offers and student discounts through Berklee.

See All Industry Events

Internships

We encourage you to supplement the learning you receive in the classroom with hands-on experiential learning via an internship during your studies. The ICC is here to assist you in obtaining and maintaining an internship that best suits your learning and career goals.

Undergraduate students can do internships once they have completed two semesters and can see the available internship courses and options here.