Study Abroad in Valencia | Berklee Valencia

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Berklee Study Abroad

Program Description

Berklee’s exclusive study abroad program offers undergraduate Berklee students from the Boston campus the opportunity to study abroad on the Valencia campus, providing an opportunity to experience the rich Mediterranean culture and preparing you to face the unique challenges in the global music industry.

The Study Abroad program focuses especially on Music Technology Programs and International Music Business, yet it is broad enough to appeal to all students who are interested in learning about other cultures and developing competencies necessary to become successful global music leaders. Students can elect to pursue a newly available minor in Music Technology. Additionally courses are offered from across the curriculum and for a variety of majors, so that all students may find the classes they need to progress in their programs and meet their graduation requirements.

The program also offers unique, meaningful and frequent opportunities for talented performers from the Boston campus. All students on the Valencia campus have the opportunity to get hands-on experience in state-of-the-art recording studios and technology labs. The Valencia experience also offers international exposure through Valencia’s student concert series at the Palau de les Arts, produced concerts in other venues throughout the Comunidad Valenciana, as well as gigs at important clubs in Valencia, Madrid and other important Spanish musical centers.

Program Dates

Fall 2015

  • Application Extended Deadline: April 6, 2015
  • Program Dates: August 31, 2015 - December 18, 2015

Spring 2016

  • Application Deadline: October 1, 2015
  • Program Dates: January 11, 2016 - May 6, 2016

For questions or more information about the program, email studyabroad@berklee.edu or call 617 747-2700.

Courses

Berklee’s Study Abroad program on the Valencia Campus provides globally-minded students the opportunity to become successful global music leaders and to prepare for international careers. Students study in Valencia, Spain, at Berklee’s new international campus. In Valencia, students may take advantage of performance and experiential learning opportunities, meet with top artists, and network within the International Music Industry. The Valencia campus experience offers students access to state-of-the-art recording and technology facilities in an intimate academic setting.

*All students must register for a full course load (12-16 credits)

Performance and Professional Music Courses

Directed Study
  • ENDS-400
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: Written approval of course instructor

The Directed Study ensemble will study and perform a specific genre or artist of their liking. In this course, students will participate in weekly supervised rehearsals. Students will gain experience in performing the particular directed studies' compositions. Emphasis will be given to stylistic integrity, as well as melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic accuracy.

Mixed Styles Rating 2
  • ENMX-121
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: ENMX-100 or overall ensemble rating 2

An instrumental ensemble that focuses on performance in a variety of musical styles. Classes will cover performance techniques utilized in contemporary musical idioms such as jazz, rock, and blues. In this course, students will participate in weekly supervised rehearsals. Students will gain experience in performing every song selected for the semester. Emphasis will be given to stylistic integrity, as well as melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic accuracy.

Mixed Styles Rating 4
  • ENMX-220
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: Overall ensemble rating 4

Small group performance in jazz, rock, swing, and Latin idioms. In this course, students will participate in weekly supervised rehearsals. Students will gain experience in performing every song selected for the semester. Emphasis will be given to stylistic integrity, as well as melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic accuracy. Instrumentation: trumpet, alto, tenor, flute, piano, guitar, bass, drums, vibes, and strings.

Recital Workshop for Performance Majors
  • ILRE-375
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: PIXX-212 and current enrollment in RPXX-311

Required for all fifth-semester performance majors. Each student will perform three times during the semester. Students will critique one another's performances. Topics to be discussed will include repertoire, stage presence, constructive criticism, and mental preparation.

Advanced Rhythmic Techniques for Performers
  • PFET-P211
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: Overall ensemble rating 3

A lab workshop specially designed to improve performers' understanding and mastery of different rhythmic concepts and their application on their instrument into various musical contexts. The students will learn percussion and speaking rhythms, which they will later apply on their own instrument. The course material will be based on different rhythmic approaches based on techniques applied in different cultures around the world, including: African, Indian, and Latin rhythmic systems and vocabulary. The workshop environment will be used to give the students practical examples of rhythmic concepts using prepared literature, specific compositions, audio tracks, and video material. They will practice performing these rhythms both individually and as a group.

Survey of Mediterranean Musical Styles
  • PFSS-P301
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: None

This course will examine the various tonalities, meters and compositional structures that characterize the various music styles from the Mediterranean region. This is a survey course focused on the folk music from the Mediterranean with a spotlight on how melody is the defining and dominant feature of the music. Students will explore modal systems with limited harmonic progression and tonalities not always consistent with western tonal systems and metric forms. The influence of religious music, the differing ethnic traditions, and the sociocultural differences of the principal music sources will be reviewed and studied. Listening, performing, songwriting, and sight singing are the main activities of this course.

Movement for Musicians
  • PMH-250
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: None

This class is designed to offer fundamentals of movement and dance for musicians. Each session includes a brief warm up followed by a dance combination and/or work on body awareness, coordination, use of time and space, development of internal pulse, and stage presence, etc. No prior dance experience is necessary.

Standard Jazz Repertoire 1
  • PSIJ-215
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: Overall ensemble rating 3

Building and retaining a functional repertoire of approximately 30 selected standards and jazz standards that form a common vocabulary and basis for study among jazz musicians. Development of skills to effectively memorize the melody, harmony, and rhythm of selected repertoire. Recommended for students who plan to take jazz improvisation techniques courses.

Basic Keyboard Techniques 1
  • ISKB-211
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: PW-111

For non-piano principals. Comping, harmonic continuity. Triads, seventh chords, melody, and accompaniment. Standard song forms, blues.

Basic Keyboard Techniques 2
  • ISKB-212
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: ISKB-211

Continuation of ISKB-211. Advanced comping, voicings, additional melody with accompaniment.

Final Project Directed Study - Online
  • PM-P476
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: Written approval of course chair

A seminar in which students receive individualized guidance in the preparation and completion of their final project. Students will develop an approach and timeline, self-evaluative criteria for assessment of their project upon completion, and gain an understanding of current and future trends in the music industry as they relate to both the final project and the student's broader career goals. This course is a remotely delivered version of the current PM-475 Final Project Seminar.

Keyboard Fundamentals - Online
  • ISKB-P111
  • 1 credit

An online keyboard program for non-piano principals designed to give students skills in note reading, chord voicings, rhythmic interpretation, technique, and other instrumental skills. Using video clips, recorded play-alongs, chord-study exercises, weekly recorded assignments, and feedback from the teacher, students will be able to play simple accompaniments, read notes on the grand staff, realize a lead sheet, apply simple voice-leading techniques, and develop hand independence and a familiarity with different styles. Students will acquire the ability to use the keyboard as a resource in learning harmony, ear training, arranging, and technology applications such as notation and sequencing.

Private Instruction
  • PIXX-XXX
  • 1 or 2 credit(s)

Recital Preparation
  • RPXX-XXX
  • 1 credit

Advanced Brazilian Rhythms and Percussion Ensemble
  • ENPC-459
  • 1 credit

In this course, students will continue to learn rhythms and percussion instruments from Brazil with emphasis on the drumming styles from the northeastern part of Brazil. Development of performance skills through study of transcriptions and supervised ensemble playing.

Brazilian Rhythms and Percussion
  • ILPH-359
  • 2 credits

A lab focusing on rhythmic techniques and song styles of Brazilian music and their related percussion instruments. Development of performance skills through study of audio and video recordings as well as supervised ensemble playing. Note: ILPH-357 may be taken instead of this course.

Music Business Courses

Business Communication
  • MB-287
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: None

An in-depth study of the nature of human and electronic communication. Students write and edit a variety of business documents including cover letters, memos, reports, and proposals, among others, as well as practice extemporaneous speaking, presenting to a group, planning and running meetings, and supervising teams.

Principles of Marketing
  • MB-325
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MB-275, LMSC-251, and either MB-255 or MB-355

An introduction to integrated marketing principles and practices within corporate and agency environments covering branding strategy and positioning, the value proposition, market research, customer relationships, target markets, buying behavior, the promotional mix, and related metrics. Students create an integrated marketing communication plan that reflects a comprehensive understanding of competitive strategy based on research findings as well as translating business objectives into effective marketing strategies and plans.

Record Company Operations
  • MB-331
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MB-201, MB-211, and LSOC-225

A critical analysis of the anatomy of domestic and international record companies, focusing on the role of each department within the structure. Students become intricately acquainted with such areas of activity as artists and repertoire (A&R), promotions, marketing, distribution, product management, and business affairs. Special attention is given to contractual relationships with artists and producers as well as domestic and international licensing of masters.

Managing Technology-Driven Business
  • MB-P389
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MB-255 or MB-355

This course will explore the underlying technology and terminology required to effectively communicate and conduct business in the technology-driven marketplace. In today's business environment, it is essential for managers and executives to understand the basic concepts behind contemporary information systems and how they can be used effectively in business. Topics include hardware, software, network architecture, information security, data warehousing, customer interfaces, and online marketing opportunities. Students will have the opportunity to work with common open source applications used for content management, customer relationship management, online purchasing and payment systems, and more.

Concerts and Touring
  • MB-391
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MB-201, MB-211, and MB-275

Business aspects of producing and promoting successful tours and shows. Emphases include: (1) the promoter's ability to purchase talent and produce successful shows, taking into consideration such matters as competition, population, guarantees and percentage splits, ticket pricing and distribution, advertising budgets, production costs, sponsorships, rental agreements, labor, security, concessions, tour packages, and promoter-owned venues; and (2) managing and producing a successful tour, focusing on a tour theme and marketing plan, routing, itineraries, riders, offers, contracts, subcontractors, show and tour personnel, merchandising, sponsorships, day-of-show, and show settlements.

International Industry Seminar
  • MB-P499
  • Prerequisites: None

This course is designed to immerse students in the European and global music industries and engage them in a variety of real-world professional settings. The term will begin with an overview of both research writing and methodology related to field study and the global music industry today. Students will interact with industry leaders, conduct interviews, and explore music business applications throughout the semester. Off-campus experiences will be partnered with weekly in-class seminar-style discussions to foster student reflections, evaluations, and comparisons between European and U.S. music and entertainment business models and policy. Several artists and industry guest lecturers will visit classes throughout the term to supplement the instruction and provide a forum for professional networking and dialogue. Students will maintain journals to formulate questions and document experiences and reflections. In addition, they will identify an area of interest relevant to the European music industry and conduct field and library research on that topic. Students will write a formal paper, describe individual progress on their research in class meetings, and offer suggestions and feedback to their peers. The class will culminate with formal presentations of individual research and research findings.

Digital Strategies and Branding for Entertainment
  • MB-P376
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MB-255 or MB-355

This course explores the impact social media has had on the music industry, specifically for independent music professionals. Students learn how to leverage the combination of social media channels with new, DIY content publishing and distribution platforms to reach a wider audience. Finally, this course shows students how this combination can allow music professionals to reach a wider audience directly, allowing them to bypass the interference of traditional mediating partners and retain more creative and even direct compensation for their work.

European Perspective on Intellectual Property and Copyrights
  • MB-P261
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MB-211

European Perspective on Intellectual Property and Copyright is a survey course reviewing the major legal aspects of music and copyright in the European Union and beyond. The course will look at the basic foundations of copyright, comparing the EU system to the US system, and then review the major issues affecting the music industry in the EU and how they function, including licensing contracts, EU directives, and intellectual property and trade agreements. Finally, the course will cover commercial music transactions in various territories and take an in-depth look at copyright concepts, as well as other forms of intellectual property protection, such as patents, trademark, and trade secrets.

Core Music Courses

Tonal Harmony and Composition 1
  • CM-211
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: PW-111

Functional tonal harmony analyzed and composed in various musical textures. Emphasis on voice leading, melodic writing, and figured bass.

Tonal Harmony and Composition 2
  • CM-212
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: CM-211 or CM-251

Continuation of CM-211. Advanced tonal harmony and intermediate compositional procedures. Emphasis on harmonies with sevenths, other upper extensions, chromatic alterations as well as modulation.

Conducting 1
  • COND-211
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: ET-211 or ET-231

Techniques of conducting vocal and instrumental music. Fundamental beat patterns. Discussion and study of terminology, problems of tempo, phrasing, and articulation.

Conducting 2
  • COND-212
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: COND-211 or COND-216

The course assumes basic beat pattern knowledge and covers three areas: (1) symphonic conducting with an instrumental soloist (concerto), (2) symphonic conducting with a vocal soloist (operatic aria), and (3) symphonic conducting of a major modern work involving complete meter changes. Works used include a romantic piano or violin concerto, an operatic excerpt, and a piece such as Petrouchka, The Rite of Spring, or Symphonies of Wind Instruments.

The Art of Counterpoint
  • CP-210
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: HR-112, ET-112, and CM-211 or CM-251

This course instructs students in the fundamental principles of free counterpoint (i.e., composition with melodic lines) with an emphasis on two-part writing. Through the utilization of a three-pronged focus on principles, literature, and experiential practice, students complete exercises and projects involving composition and performance within the common-practice period with additional attention to and experience in contemporary tonal practice.

 

Ear Training 3
  • ET-211
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: ET-112

Development of ear training skills through performance and dictation. Study of melodies, intervals, harmony, and solfege in Lydian, Mixolydian, Dorian, and Phrygian modes, mixed modes, and harmonic and melodic minor. Continued study of rhythms, meters, conducting patterns, and notation.

Ear Training 4
  • ET-212
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: ET-211

Continuation of ET-211. Modal singing and dictation studies. Interval studies, two- and three-part dictation. Basic atonal melodic studies.

Harmony 3
  • HR-211
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: HR-112

Students continue their analysis and application of major and minor key harmony; elaboration of subdominant minor and modal interchange; and chord scale theory. Students review melodic construction and the melody/harmony relationship. They also review the individual note analysis of melodies. The course introduces substitute dominant and related II-7 chords, diminished chord patterns, and modulation.

 

Harmony 4
  • HR-212
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: HR-211

This course provides continued study of principles of modern chord progression, particularly deceptive resolutions of secondary dominants, dominant seventh chords without dominant function, and contiguous dominant motion. Students examine melodic construction, form, and melody/harmony relationship; modal interchange; pedal point and ostinato; modal harmony and modal composition; compound chords; and constant structures.

 

Contemporary Writing and Production and Film Scoring Courses

Arranging 2
  • AR-112
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: AR-111 and HR-112

In this course, students study the properties of the trumpet, alto saxophone, tenor saxophone, trombone, and baritone saxophone. Students also explore the writing and arranging processes of standard and spread voicings, as well as approach techniques, melodic embellishment, and guide tone backgrounds. Students apply the writing processes to soli and background writing for two-, three-, four-, and five-part combinations of these instruments. It is recommended that CW-171 be taken by CWPR majors prior to enrolling in AR-112.

 

DAW Writing and Production
  • CW-261
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: ISKB-211 (non-piano principals) and CW-191 or PW-161

The advanced student will learn to utilize digital audio workstations (DAW) to create arrangements of either original or existing musical elements. This course focuses on the creative use of technology in music production. Topics covered include signal flow of MIDI and audio signal within the DAW sound processing plugins, choosing appropriate sounds and combining elements from software synthesizers, alternate approaches to quantizing and refining rhythmic grooves, hybrid production techniques (audio and MIDI), use of the DAW for scoring to picture and basic synthesis techniques. In addition to using their own laptops in the Professional Writing Technology Lab students are expected to have the CWP major bundle.

Flamenco Music Composition and Arranging
  • CW-P227
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: AR-111

This course examines the concepts and techniques of writing flamenco music, which is a vital and growing genre in contemporary music. The course covers the origins of the various styles of flamenco, their individual influences, primary composers of flamenco, overview of popular lyrics, and common composition and arranging techniques in flamenco styles. Students will investigate the various aspects of writing flamenco music: use of improvised structure; binary, ternary, and polyrhythm rhythmic styles; traditional harmonic approaches and concepts; melodic approaches; and the use of microtones. A variety of compositions, arrangements, and orchestrations will be analyzed, including examples of contemporary compositions and new stylistic variations in flamenco that feature the use of electronics and flamenco without guitar. Students will create compositions and/or arrangements for a flamenco music ensemble.

Sequencing and Production Techniques
  • CW-191
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: AR-111 and MTEC-111

The course covers the necessary tools, techniques, and applications of MIDI sequencing and digital audio for writing and production. Main topics include the MIDI standard and its applications, set up and use of digital audio workstations (DAWs), integration of MIDI and audio tracks/sources, use of software synthesizers, basic mixing techniques, audio theory, equipment, and techniques. Through practical examples, activities, and projects the student will learn how to effectively use a DAW to write and produce music. Emphasis is on technological needs of the contemporary writer.

Introduction to Film Scoring for Non-Majors
  • FS-P114
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: LENG-111

Investigation of the aesthetic relationship between film and music. Discussion of the many functions of film music with analysis of its most effective application to dramatic situations. Exploration of career opportunities in film and television music. This course is suitable for students not intending to major in film scoring.

Groove Writing
  • CW-171
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: AR-111, ET-112, HR-112, and MTEC-111

Expanding on the material introduced in AR-111, this course focuses on creating and writing grooves for the rhythm section (guitar, keyboard, bass, percussion, and drums) and the ways in which different grooves work together. Original techniques and practical approaches to creating grooves will be presented, as well as methods to refine and create variations in grooves and scoring with production goals in mind. Styles studied include funk, hip-hop, rock, reggae, and ska; Latin styles, including bossa, samba, salsa, cha-cha, songo, and baion; shuffle, as used in rock, blues, and funk; generic dance grooves such as techno; and pop and Euro-pop. Projects will include transcription, sequencing, and live performance of grooves.

Liberal Arts Courses

Art History Topics
  • LAHS-233
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: LENG-111

The various sections of Art History Topics focus on different and more narrowly defined themes, rather than a broad historical survey. Topics may include the Art of Egypt, the meeting of Eastern and Western Art, 20th-Century American and European Art, and others. Periodically, a visiting scholar may teach a section on the art, architecture, and archeology of cultures such as those of pre-Columbian Central and South America; the indigenous peoples of North America; and the various societies of Africa, Asia, or the Middle East. The focus of these special sections would include the material artifacts and the interpretations, debates, and methodological approaches to these objects within the literature of the field. All sections of this course present individual topics. Individual course descriptions are available to registering students at http://www.berklee.edu/liberal-arts/courses/liberal-arts-topics-courses.

English as a Second Language 1
  • LENG-104
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: English Proficiency Exam

In this course, speakers of other languages will develop the skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in English necessary for success in all college classes. Students will read articles, essays, and stories; write short narrative and expository essays; develop their vocabulary; and review intermediate grammar structures.

English As a Second Language 2
  • LENG-105
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: LENG-104 or sufficient test score

A continuation of LENG-104, this course will help speakers of other languages improve their ability to speak English effectively, listen with understanding, read with comprehension, and write with clarity. Students will read college-level materials (articles, essays, short stories); write narrative, expository, and persuasive essays; expand their vocabulary; and review advanced grammar structures.

English As a Second Language 3
  • LENG-106
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: English Proficiency Exam

In this course, speakers of other languages will develop reading, writing, and critical-thinking skills necessary for success in LENG-111 and other college classes. Students will write short essays (narrative, expository, persuasive) focusing on issues of clarity, organization, development, unity, and coherence. They will read and analyze college-level texts, including articles, essays, and short stories; develop their vocabulary in academic and non-academic contexts; and review advanced grammar structures.

Literature
  • LENG-201
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: LENG-111

In this course, students explore different themes and genres within the field of literature, examining critical and creative thinking through literary analysis. Students apply the skills of synthesis, interpretation, and evaluation in writing and speaking about fiction, drama, poetry, creative nonfiction, and literary criticism. Students also explore concepts related to aesthetics such as beauty, rhythm, and sound; and concepts of literary analysis such as plot, point of view, character, tone, and style. Students complete analytical and creative writing assignments. The titles of individual sections of LENG-201 identify the theme of that section. Individual course descriptions are available to registering students at http://www.berklee.edu/liberal-arts/courses/liberal-arts-topics-courses.

History Topics
  • LHIS-223
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: LENG-111

History Topics courses enable students to choose from a variety of course themes that change each semester. Topics focus on a variety of historical periods and ideas. In History Topics courses, students explore the role of historical sources in the formation of ideas, as they examine various historical interpretations, debates, and methodologies. Students come to recognize that not all questions have simple yes-or-no, right-or-wrong answers. Students learn to appreciate and respect diversity and are able to identify bias in written and media sources used to document history. Individual course descriptions are available to registering students at http://www.berklee.edu/liberal-arts/courses/liberal-arts-topics-courses.

Professional Development Seminar
  • LHUM-400
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: Sixth-semester standing

The Professional Development Seminar provides an opportunity for students in their sixth semester to reflect upon their academic and professional experience at Berklee, prepare to complete their Berklee programs, and transition from college into the professional world and/or graduate school. Students evaluate their knowledge, skills, abilities, and interests as they develop and/or refine college and career goals. Students also explore their own identities and their professional and personal relationships as they reflect on the role of the artist in society generally and their role as a musician in their community specifically. Students learn business, entrepreneurship, legal, and communication skills, and address issues of business ethics. Additionally, students refine and redirect their Berklee College of Music electronic portfolio towards a professional model and explore issues of presentation and critique. The Professional Development Seminar provides a creative and reflective atmosphere that encourages students to participate in their own learning while preparing for their future.

Health and Wellness
  • LMSC-221
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: LENG-111

This course is designed to provide a scientific approach to issues of health and wellness necessary for the pursuit of a healthy lifestyle. Topics such as nutrition, exercise, stress, sexuality, substance abuse, eating disorders, and the physical environment will be examined in the context of human physiology. Note: This course may be used to fulfill the natural science requirement.

General Psychology
  • LSOC-211
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: LENG-111

This course is a survey of the history, theory, and applications of general psychology, including the study of human behavior, factors in psychological development, methods of measurement, and the brain.

 

Principles of Economics
  • LSOC-225
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: Passing score on the Math Proficiency Exam, LMSC-130, or completion of college level precalculus or higher

An analysis of supply and demand in the international music marketplace, as affecting issues of pricing, employment, the output of goods and services, and competition. Emphasis is also placed on the techniques of financial management found within a music-oriented business, including planning and forecasting, allocation of resources, and profit analysis, as well as the monetary transmission mechanisms found in international business. Note: For MBUS majors, this course can be used to fulfill the social science requirement for degree students.

Introductory Spanish 1
  • LSPN-161
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: None

This course covers basic grammar, composition, and cultural reading selections. The emphasis is on pronunciation and conversational Spanish. Note: This course is not available for credit to students for whom this is a first language.

Introductory Spanish 2
  • LSPN-262
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: LSPN-161 or LSPN-P100

A continuation of LSPN-161, this course covers more advanced grammar, composition, and reading selections. Emphasis continues on pronunciation and conversational Spanish. Note: This course is not available for credit to students for whom this is a first language.

Intermediate Spanish 1
  • LSPN-363
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: LSPN-262

This course develops the language skills built in Spanish 1 and 2. Students learn Latin American and Spanish culture, including music and literature. Exploring a variety of texts and disciplines, and focusing on conversation, students deepen their language skills. Grammar lessons are embedded in reading and writing assignments.

Intermediate Spanish 2
  • LSPN-464
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: LSPN-363

Spanish 4 is a continuation of Spanish 3 as students develop advanced language skills through readings and analyses of literature and cinema. This course focuses on representations of Latin American and Spanish culture including music, poetry, and fiction. Students explore a variety of texts as a means of deepening language skills through an integrated curriculum. Grammar lessons will be embedded in reading and writing assignments.

Music Acoustics
  • LMSC-208
  • 3 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: Passing score on the Math Proficiency Exam, LMSC-130, or completion of college level precalculus or higher

This course is a survey of acoustical phenomena relating to music. The course includes an overview of the nature of sound waves and vibration, sound propagation and room acoustics, sound level and its measurement, the human ear and perception, and tuning systems. Course material is directed toward the contemporary musician's need to understand acoustical phenomena in various contexts, including performance, writing, and music technology applications. Note: This course may be used to fulfill the physical science requirement. For ELPD and MPED majors, LMSC-208 can be used to fulfill both the natural science requirement for degree students and the acoustics requirement in the major concentrate.

Spanish Music, Culture, and Society
  • LMAS-P259
  • 3 credits

In this course, students will become familiar with the underlying anthropological and sociological foundations of modern Spanish culture. The course content will provide a solid understanding of the cultural idiosyncrasy of the Spanish people in addition to an overview of Spain’s history. Students will also explore and analyze different trends and phenomena of modern day Spain, along with some traditions that still hold in our time. Spanish music history and artistry from ancient times to the present will be studied, with a special focus on the way that music shapes and is shaped by society. Students will study Spanish styles of music, including, among others, folk, popular music, and flamenco. An exploration of the ways that other Mediterranean cultures have shaped Spain will be used as a lens to explore music history, artistry, and culture. In addition, students will explore the ways that music is an expressive form that reflects and influences society.

European Music History
  • MHIS-P201
  • 2 credits

Music Technology Courses

Accelerated Pro Tools
  • MP-113
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MTEC-111

Pro Tools has become the undisputed recording industry standard for digital audio production. It provides a comprehensive and powerful environment for audio recording, MIDI sequencing, editing, and inside-the-box mixing. This course will jump-start your Pro Tools production chops, covering a full range of basic as well as advanced tools and techniques in a single semester. Prior experience with Pro Tools or another DAW is highly recommended. You must have access to a native Pro Tools rig running current Pro Tools software. (Check with the MP&E Department for specific requirements.)

Critical Listening Lab for Musicians
  • MP-114
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MTEC-111

This online course focuses on developing critical listening skills with particular emphasis on analyzing recording and mix techniques in the context of the popular music mix. Topics include: acoustics of the critical listening environment; mix elements such as balances, panning, EQ, reverb, compression, delay and time-based effects; instrument identification; stylistic comparisons of recording and mix techniques. Listening analysis examples and concepts are reinforced through weekly critical listening assignments. A set of weekly audio ear training drills are also part of the class.

Production Analysis Lab for Musicians
  • MP-115
  • 1 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MTEC-111

This course represents a step-by-step approach to the essential elements of effective records. Using in-class evaluation of demos, masters and commercial recordings, it takes students through an in-depth analysis and appraisal of the emotional effectiveness of recordings, with consideration for: artist identity, vision and intention; melody, lyrics and song form; arrangement, performance, and mixing. Several in-class presentations of student analysis projects are required.

Recording and Mix Techniques for Musicians
  • MP-205
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MP-114, and either MP-113, EP-225, or MTEC-112

For non-MPED majors, this course is a hands-on study of modern recording, mixing, programming and post-production techniques, oriented toward musicians with the need to record themselves and others in a hybrid home studio recording environment. Through a series of hands-on projects, culminating in a final recording, programming and mixing project, students will learn the fundamentals of analog and digital audio technology, microphones, recording techniques, audio signal flow, DAW session management and file exchange, integration of MIDI with audio tracks, signal processing, editing and professional mixing techniques. 

Live Sound and Stage Craft
  • MTI-P304
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MTEC-111

Live Sound and Stage Craft teaches students the ins and outs of setting up and operating sound reinforcement systems. Students develop knowledge of signal flow, mixing board operation, microphone choice and placement as well as strategies to avoid feedback. Weekly hands-on guided set up and operation of sound reinforcement systems help illustrate concepts and allow students to learn through the power of experience. This includes mixing from the stage while performing, mixing for other musicians for and from the FOH (front of house) position, as well as monitors. In addition, students acquire effective set up and stage management skills as well as the common communication protocol with other musicians and technicians in live sound reinforcement situations. Finally, implementation of adapted practices and systems for problematic spaces or venues is also explored. Students will also gain experience with basic lighting and video stagecraft systems.

Recording Skills for Music Production
  • MTI-P305
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MTEC-111

In this project-based production and engineering course, students complete two production projects: a step-by-step, singer-songwriter multitrack recording, and an exact sound-alike of an existing pivotal or hit record. In doing this, students acquire technical skills, including multitrack recording techniques, microphone technique for vocals, guitars, drum-set and other instruments, an understanding of signal flow, equalization, compression, gain stages, and effective capture of musical audio. Students also gain experience with effective techniques of music production, including identifying goals, serving the emotional content of the song, effective arranging for records, and interpersonal issues surrounding the recording process.

Mixing for Musicians
  • MTI-P306
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MTEC-111

This is a project-based mixing course geared toward musicians. Students learn basic aspects of editing, mixing and delivery in the modern DAW environment. Students also learn mixing techniques and analysis, and an introduction to digital editing and signal processing. Students complete this course in conjunction with MTI-P305 Production and Recording Stratagems. Together, in the two courses, students learn the complete production process from preproduction though the mixing and delivery stage.

Virtual Production Techniques
  • MTI-P308
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MTEC-111

This is an 'in-the-box' project-based virtual production course. Students learn to produce short sound-alikes of fragments of contemporary hit records employing sequencing and virtual instruments. They also learn to produce a full acoustic band cover using virtual instruments and one live instrument and/or vocalist. Additionally they learn to produce short musical creations by chopping and editing audio, incorporating tempo mapping, elastic audio, Melodyne, looping, beat detective, and other manipulation tools. Students also learn the skills needed to edit and arrange music to picture.

Music Video Production and Dissemination
  • MTI-P309
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MTEC-111

This course provides an introduction to the art and technology of creating music videos. Students learn the challenges and possibilities of representing music visually through the art of filmmaking. They explore the fundamental tools and techniques of music video production by reviewing and analyzing groundbreaking music videos. They also apply those techniques in the hands-on production of personal music videos.

Live Electronic Performance and DJ Skills
  • MTI-P310
  • 2 credit(s)
  • Prerequisites: MTEC-111

An introduction to live electronic music performance and DJ skills, beginning with the use of the turntable as a musical instrument. Students will explore the culture and aesthetics of Hip-hop, turntablism, club DJs, radio, and mash-up DJs, and will master the following techniques: cueing, mixing, beat matching, beat extending, mash-ups, blending, and scratching (basic, scribble, laser, uzi, stab, cut, transformer, crab, chirp and flare). Students will create their own live mixes and present them as midterm and final performances.

Electronic Dance Music Creation
  • MTI-P307
  • 2 credits

This course explores topics in electronic production and live performance techniques related to modern electronic dance music production, sound design, arrangement, and performance. Students will generate content and create their own music while learning how to use Ableton Live Suite. Students will learn to analyze electronic music, and explore techniques for remixing, performing, and creating electronic music.

Music Technology Minor


Berklee's minor in Music Technology arms students with the tools they need to effectively leverage technology to create and distribute their music. The immersive, integrated courses are designed to be completed in one semester at Berklee’s state-of-the-art Valencia campus, taking full advantage of its powerful combination of facilities, staff and faculty.

The minor consists of all required courses and one elective course, for a total of 10 credits. Some courses may also be available at Berklee's Boston campus or online.

Required Courses

Critical Listening Lab for Musicians
  • MP-114
  • 1 credit(s)

This online course focuses on developing critical listening skills with particular emphasis on analyzing recording and mix techniques in the context of the popular music mix. Topics include: acoustics of the critical listening environment; mix elements such as balances, panning, EQ, reverb, compression, delay and time-based effects; instrument identification; stylistic comparisons of recording and mix techniques. Listening analysis examples and concepts are reinforced through weekly critical listening assignments. A set of weekly audio ear training drills are also part of the class.

Production Analysis Lab for Musicians
  • MP-115
  • 1 credit(s)

This course represents a step-by-step approach to the essential elements of effective records. Using in-class evaluation of demos, masters and commercial recordings, it takes students through an in-depth analysis and appraisal of the emotional effectiveness of recordings, with consideration for: artist identity, vision and intention; melody, lyrics and song form; arrangement, performance, and mixing. Several in-class presentations of student analysis projects are required.

Live Sound and Stage Craft
  • MTI-P304
  • 2 credit(s)

Live Sound and Stage Craft teaches students the ins and outs of setting up and operating sound reinforcement systems. Students develop knowledge of signal flow, mixing board operation, microphone choice and placement as well as strategies to avoid feedback. Weekly hands-on guided set up and operation of sound reinforcement systems help illustrate concepts and allow students to learn through the power of experience. This includes mixing from the stage while performing, mixing for other musicians for and from the FOH (front of house) position, as well as monitors. In addition, students acquire effective set up and stage management skills as well as the common communication protocol with other musicians and technicians in live sound reinforcement situations. Finally, implementation of adapted practices and systems for problematic spaces or venues is also explored. Students will also gain experience with basic lighting and video stagecraft systems.

Recording Skills for Music Production
  • MTI-P305
  • 2 credit(s)

In this project-based production and engineering course, students complete two production projects: a step-by-step, singer-songwriter multitrack recording, and an exact sound-alike of an existing pivotal or hit record. In doing this, students acquire technical skills, including multitrack recording techniques, microphone technique for vocals, guitars, drum-set and other instruments, an understanding of signal flow, equalization, compression, gain stages, and effective capture of musical audio. Students also gain experience with effective techniques of music production, including identifying goals, serving the emotional content of the song, effective arranging for records, and interpersonal issues surrounding the recording process.

Mixing for Musicians
  • MTI-P306
  • 2 credit(s)

This is a project-based mixing course geared toward musicians. Students learn basic aspects of editing, mixing and delivery in the modern DAW environment. Students also learn mixing techniques and analysis, and an introduction to digital editing and signal processing. Students complete this course in conjunction with MTI-P305 Production and Recording Stratagems. Together, in the two courses, students learn the complete production process from preproduction though the mixing and delivery stage.

Elective Courses

Electronic Dance Music Creation With Ableton Live
  • MTI-P307
  • 2 credit(s)

This course explores topics in electronic production and live performance techniques related to modern electronic dance music production, sound design, arrangement, and performance. Students will generate content and create their own music while learning how to use Ableton Live Suite. Students will learn to analyze electronic music, and explore techniques for remixing, performing, and creating electronic music.

Virtual Production Techniques
  • MTI-P308
  • 2 credit(s)

This is an 'in-the-box' project-based virtual production course. Students learn to produce short sound-alikes of fragments of contemporary hit records employing sequencing and virtual instruments. They also learn to produce a full acoustic band cover using virtual instruments and one live instrument and/or vocalist. Additionally they learn to produce short musical creations by chopping and editing audio, incorporating tempo mapping, elastic audio, Melodyne, looping, beat detective, and other manipulation tools. Students also learn the skills needed to edit and arrange music to picture.

Music Video Production and Dissemination
  • MTI-P309
  • 2 credit(s)

This course provides an introduction to the art and technology of creating music videos. Students learn the challenges and possibilities of representing music visually through the art of filmmaking. They explore the fundamental tools and techniques of music video production by reviewing and analyzing groundbreaking music videos. They also apply those techniques in the hands-on production of personal music videos.

Live Electronic Performance and DJ Skills
  • MTI-P310
  • 2 credit(s)

An introduction to live electronic music performance and DJ skills, beginning with the use of the turntable as a musical instrument. Students will explore the culture and aesthetics of Hip-hop, turntablism, club DJs, radio, and mash-up DJs, and will master the following techniques: cueing, mixing, beat matching, beat extending, mash-ups, blending, and scratching (basic, scribble, laser, uzi, stab, cut, transformer, crab, chirp and flare). Students will create their own live mixes and present them as midterm and final performances.

Advising

Steps to Study Abroad

  1. Submit the online application.
  2. Get accepted to the program.
  3. Meet with your academic advisor or chair for you major(s).
  4. Turn in all completed forms in your acceptance packet by the given deadline.
  5. Attend the mandatory pre-departure orientation session.
  6. Pack your bags!

Information Sessions

To learn more about the study abroad process, attend one of our information sessions. You will learn about the Valencia campus, housing, classes you can take, available minors, and all the steps you need to take to study in Spain.

Information sessions are typically held every Thursday during the fall and spring semester at 1:00 pm in Berklee’s Office of Global Initiatives. Once you attend one of these sessions, you can meet with an advisor to discuss any additional questions or concerns.

SIGN UP FOR AN INFO SESSION*

*Please note that information sessions are held on Berklee’s Boston campus on the fourth floor of the Office of Global Initiatives at 855 Boylston Street (see map).

One-on-One Advising Appointments

The first step of the process is to attend an information session, and then you can schedule an advising appointment with a staff member from the Study Abroad office. Advising hours are by appointment only. To schedule an appointment call the Study Abroad office at 617-747-2700 or email us at studyabroad@berklee.edu.

Admissions

Eligibility

This program is open only to students currently enrolled at Berklee College of Music.

Applicants should have:

  • Completed their 2nd semester or higher at Berklee by the program start date
  • Good academic, judicial, and financial standing at Berklee

Application

To apply, applicants must submit an Online Application.

  • Fall 2015 Application Extended Deadline: April 6, 2015
  • Spring 2016 Application Deadline: October 1, 2015

Decisions

Potential candidates may be contacted for an in-person interview. Applicants will be notified of the decisions via their berklee.net e-mail account. Participation is contingent upon continued good academic, judicial, and financial standing each semester.

Passport & Visa

All participants must have a passport that is valid for at least six (6) months after the program’s end date. Most students will need to obtain a student visa to study in Spain. The Study Abroad staff can provide guidance in applying for the passport and visa but it is ultimately the student's responsibility to apply for and obtain them. If you do not currently have a passport, please get one now, as it could take 4-6 weeks or longer. Accepted students will receive more information in their acceptance packet.

For questions or more information about the program, email studyabroad@berklee.edu or call 617 747-2700.

Faculty

Fabien Aubry

Insrtuctor

Clara Barbera

Instructor

Daniel Flors

Instructor

Javier Loscos

Instructor

Catalina Millan

Instructor

David Nordlund

Instructor

German Ramos

Instructor

Chris Wainwright

Assistant Professor

Tuition and Fees

The following costs represent one semester on the Valencia campus. Required charges and optional charges are billed directly to you on your tuition bill. Indirect costs are an estimate of associated travel and living costs, and vary depending on each student's individual situation and preferences.

Required Charges

Charges below are for Berklee undergraduate students. Students from Emerson, USFQ, and Tecnólogico de Monterrey should check with their institution to confirm program costs.

Berklee Tuition
Tuition is same as a semester in Boston
$19,470 (degree)
$16,783 (diploma)
Berklee Comprehensive Fee
Fee is same as a semester in Boston
$571
Study Abroad Program Fee
Program fee includes supplemental travel/health insurance, student orientation, and cultural activities.
$500
Housing
Housing is required for all students.
$2,620 (double room)
$3,970 (single room)

Optional Charges

Berklee Health Insurance
Insurance is mandatory, but may be waived.
See berklee.edu for more information.
TBD
Optional Trip to Granada
More information is available in the acceptance packet.
$570

Indirect Costs

Passport Fee
Fee varies depending on the type of service requested and passport country.
$0-$210
Student Visa Fee
Fee varies depending on country of citizenship.
$0-$160
Round-Trip Airfare to Valencia
Estimated airfare from Boston
$800-$1200
Books
Estimated cost (same as Boston)
$237
Meals
Estimated costs based on $20/day. Optional meal plan is available at the student residence for purchase.
$2,400
Local Transportation
Estimated based on public bike rental, bus, and metro.
$300
Personal Expenses
Shopping, gifts, entertainment, etc.
$500

Program Deposit

Upon acceptance, a non-refundable $300 program deposit is required to confirm a spot in the program. The deposit can be paid online at berklee.edu/tuitiondeposit. The deposit is non-refundable and may not be transferred to another semester. If you remain in the program, the deposit will be credited towards your tuition statement. If you withdraw from the program, you will lose your deposit.

Housing

Students stay at the Galileo Galilei student residence, located at the Valencia Polytechnic University. Your choices are a single room with private bath or a double room with a private bath that is shared by you and your roommate. Internet, linens (sheets and towels), and weekly cleaning services are included. The housing fee does not include a meal plan. You will have the option to purchase a meal plan at the student residence.

All students are required to live in the student residence. Living together as a cohort of students provides a safe and comfortable environment while abroad. However, if you have a parent/guardian that lives in Valencia, are age 24 or older, or have a disability which requires accommodations that the student residence is not able to provide, you may request to have the housing requirement waived. Please contact the Study Abroad office for more information.

Financial Aid & Scholarships

Berklee financial aid and scholarships (except work-study) apply to your semester in Valencia. Upon being accepted to the program, it is recommended that students meet with their Financial Aid Counselor to review their award package. Students must ensure that they fulfill all requirements necessary to maintain their award(s) before departing for the program. Students who have received a scholarship from a source outside of Berklee should speak with the Bursar's Office to review how the award can be applied to the cost of the program.

The Gilman Scholarship Program offers awards for undergraduate study abroad and was established by the International Academic Opportunity Act of 2000. This scholarship provides awards for U.S. undergraduate students who are receiving Federal Pell Grant funding to participate in study abroad programs. Visit the Gilman Scholarship website for more information and to apply.